Cindy Gordon
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 774-249-4824 | cindygordonhomes@gmail.com


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 1/14/2018

It's many homeowners' worst fear to come home to a water disaster in their home. Water damage can cost thousands to repair and will include a lengthy process in order to adhere to safety standards, potentially disrupting your home life for weeks. In this article we'll give you tips on how to avoid water damage and what to do when you discover it.

Water damage vs. flood damage

Many people are unaware of the difference between water damage and flood damage. Water damage can occur when you have plumbing issues such as a leaking pipe or overflowing bath tub. Flood damage, on the other hand, is defined by FEMA as an "overflow of inland or tidal waters, unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters," or even mudflow. Flood damage tends to be the more costly and the more dangerous of the two, as it puts home inhabitants at serious health risk. Part of the stipulation in differing between the two types of damage is insurance coverage; water damage is often covered by homeowner's insurance whereas flood damage is not.

Avoiding water damage

To avoid costly and time-consuming repairs, follow these steps to prevent water damage from occurring in your home:
  • Keep your gutters clean to avoid backups and drainage issues
  • divert rain water away from your house with downspouts
  • Disconnect hoses and turn off their water supply when temperatures drop to freezing overnight
  • Don't leave water using appliances running while you are away from home for extended periods of time
  • Keep up with maintenance on your dishwasher, washing machine, toilets, and tubs
  • Turn off your water main when you go away on vacations
  • Check the water pressure to your home. High water pressure can be nice in the shower, but pressures too high can cause your plumbing to fail
  • Check regularly for leaks. Some water damage may go unnoticed for weeks or months, which subjects you to another danger: mold

What to do if you have water damage in your home

If it's too late for prevention and you've discovered water damage in your home there are several steps you'll need to take to ensure the safety of your home.
  • Turn off electronics in the affected area. If possible switch off power to whole the whole section of your home at the circuit breaker. This first step is to ensure your own safety. Once you've turned off power to all potentially dangerous electronics, you can move on to the next step.
  • Remove electronics and other perishable items from the area. If you remove the items soon enough you might be able to salvage them by drying them out.
  • Soak up the bulk of the water. You can do this the old fashion way by using towels and buckets. Or you can use a wet/dry vacuum cleaner to suck up the water from rugs, carpets, and other surfaces.
  • Dry the area completely. To avoid mold, use fans and a dehumidifier to fully dry out the area.
  • Disinfect. Spray the area to remove any bacteria that may have accumulated due to moisture.
  • Contact the professionals. A contractor will be able to tell you the full extent of the damage and whether any serious repairs will need to me made.
 





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 1/7/2018

When you think of making improvements to your home, you probably often turn to the inside of your home to bring the value of your home up. The outside of your house provides the same type of opportunities and adds value at the same time. People not only like to live in the indoors of their homes, but the outdoors as well. Maximizing the outdoor space allows for entertainment opportunities and increased living space without maximum costs.


Spruce Up Your Garden And Landscapes


The landscape of your home is a revolving battle. You’ll need to continually maintain these areas of the home. Choose your plants based on the climate you live in. Keep the grass looking green, or plant a drought-tolerant yard. Adding trees for shade, shrubbery for beauty, and other types of plants not only helps increase the curb appeal of your home, but plants and trees can lower energy bills and keep your home cool at the same time.      



Build An Outdoor Space


Building something like a deck or a patio to your home can really be effective at adding living space and value to your home. Whether you decide to go all out and attach a deck to your home for you to step out on, or do things a little more simply and pave a patio, you’ll find a return on your investment. Most homeowners look for a nice outdoor space to hang out on, so this improvement can make a big difference. 


Curb Appeal Matters


The curb appeal of your home is what it looks like when people pull up tot he front of the house. Having a better looking home from the outside can increase the value of your home and the future appeal it has to buyers. Your home will be more inviting by doing improvements like repaving the driveway or adding a stone wall. Whatever you think the front of your home needs to make it more inviting should be done not only if you’re planning on selling your home, but for your own enjoyment as well. 


Add Other Touches


There are certain luxuries in a yard that can make a big difference. Add a small waterfall or a fountain to add a lot to a yard. Along with your deck or patio area, you should also consider adding a fire pit or an outdoor fireplace. These items attract people for their immense enjoyment. The design doesn’t even need to be elaborate. These can be some of the biggest, yet most inexpensive improvements that you can make to your yard. 


Remember that no matter how you want to spruce up your yard, it’s all about enjoyment and the ability to make use your yard. Add the personal touches that you know will make your yard special and purposeful.





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 1/6/2018

This Single-Family in West Boylston, MA recently sold for $680,000. This Contemporary style home was sold by Cindy Gordon - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.


10 Olde Century Farm Rd, West Boylston, MA 01583

Single-Family

$700,000
Price
$680,000
Sale Price

10
Rooms
4
Beds
4/1
Full/Half Baths
This stunning home is perfect for entertaining with its flexible, open concept unique layout. The main level is filled with windows and sliders that allows the sun to stream through. It includes a living area with a large dining area with a wet bar, a top of the line Cherry kitchen outfitted with top of the line Jenn-air appliances, a open comfortable family room with fireplace, a master suite with a spa-like bath and a 9x10 walk-in closet, a sun room with a fireplace, private office, and numerous built-ins. The second level has a three additional bedrooms and 2 full bathrooms. Over the garage is a 20x27 great room/in-law suite with a spacious dining area, kitchen, full bath and filled with natural sunlight. Outside you have a sweeping patio which adds outdoor living space & overlooks a manicured lawn & private back yard. Make sure you check out the virtual tour!

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Cindy Gordon on 12/31/2017

What happens if you receive an offer on your home that fails to meet your expectations? Ultimately, you may want to decline the offer. But before you do, there are several questions you'll want to consider, including:

1. Is the offer "fair"?

Let's face it – one home seller's definition of a "fair" offer may differ from another's. However, an informed home seller will be able to differentiate a "lowball" offer from a strong proposal.

A lowball offer typically fails to account for a home's condition and the current state of the housing market. As such, this proposal may fall far below a home seller's initial asking price.

On the other hand, a strong proposal may meet or surpass a home seller's initial asking price. This offer likely accounts for a home's strengths and weaknesses, along with the needs of a both the homebuyer and home seller.

2. Are there any other offers on the table?

If you receive an offer on your home, you'll probably have one to two days to decide how to proceed. And if you have multiple offers in hand, you likely have a lot to think about in a short period of time.

In some cases, the best offer is not necessarily the highest offer, and for good reason.

For instance, a homebuyer may submit an offer on a home that exceeds a home seller's initial asking price. But if this homebuyer has not been pre-approved for a mortgage, he or she likely will need to obtain financing to proceed with a home purchase.

Conversely, a homebuyer who has been pre-approved for a mortgage knows exactly how much money is at his or her disposal. When this homebuyer submits an offer, he or she may be better equipped than other homebuyers to acquire a residence.

3. Can I afford to be patient?

Consider your timeline as you debate whether to decline an offer.

If you're in no rush to sell your home, you can afford to be patient with offers on your house. Or, if you want to relocate to a new address as soon as possible, you should price your home aggressively from the get-go.

4. If I decline an offer, what will happen next?

After you decline an offer on your home, the homebuyer has the option to submit a new proposal or move on to other houses.

As a home seller, it is important to take an informed approach to home offers. With a real estate agent at your side, you should have no trouble making the best decisions on any proposals.

A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of the housing market and can help you evaluate all offers on your residence. He or she can provide you with honest, unbiased real estate recommendations and ensure you can get the best results during the home selling journey.

Collaborate with a real estate agent – you'll be glad you did. A real estate agent will enable you to evaluate home proposals and maximize the value of your house.





Posted by Cindy Gordon on 12/24/2017

Behind your doors and windows lies everything you hold dear. Your family, pets, important documents, expensive laptops and televisions, and any number of things rely on the hope that no one will break into your home. In spite of this, many people choose not to take the best safety precautions available, whether it is because they feel safe in their neighborhood or they think they can't afford a security system. As home security technologies advance, homeowners and renters get a growing selection of security systems. Finding a security system that works with your budget while still keeping you safer is possible. However, learning about the various systems and choosing one that works best for your needs is the hard part. In this article, we'll cover the basic types of security systems and what they offer so you can make the best decision for your home and family.

Monitored or unmonitored

One way of dividing up security systems is monitored and unmonitored. Monitored systems depend on landline, cellular, or broadband connection to communicate with the security provider who will call your home and alert authorities in case of a break-in. Unmonitored systems, on the other hand, rely only on alarms such as sirens and flashing lights. Monitored systems that are connected via landline have the disadvantage of being cut or by losing connections due to power outages. Cellular-based systems (a.k.a. wireless monitoring) have the advantage of staying up even if your telephone line is cut. One disadvantage of monitored systems is that they often come with monitoring fees. The disadvantage of unmonitored systems is that it relies on your neighbors to call the police in case of an emergency. The problem with this is that not all neighbors are going to go see if everything is okay until it's potentially too late.

Contracts and Installation

Depending on whether you rent or own your house and how long you plan to stay in your house, you'll want to read over contracts before signing away. If you plan on moving or are only leasing your apartment, it might be a better option to buy a system outright that you can set up yourself at your next home. Systems that rely on technicians for installs may charge you fees for having to relocate or uninstall your system.

Added features

Home security and home automation are two separate industries that have become one due to similarities in the way they function. Many home security companies now offer automation technologies that allow you to control various items in your home remotely. If you can't remember if you locked your door or if you need to unlock it for a house guest, there's no need to leave work--just hit a button on your smart phone to unlock the door. Other systems even allow you to answer your doorbell remotely from your smartphone in the same way that you would have a conversation on your phone. If you are paranoid about checking up on your house, you could go with a system that allows you to view your security cameras live feed right from your phone or computer.   Now that you know the basics of home security systems, go check out some of the top rated providers and compare prices. You'll soon be on your way to making your home an even safer place for you and your family.